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A's

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A's

Post by AQWisgood on Thu Jun 09, 2011 3:21 pm

A summary of A's soon coming the alphabet!
A's
"A" can be traced to a pictogram of an ox head in Egyptian hieroglyph or the Proto-Sinaitic alphabet. [2] It has stood at the head of every alphabet in which it has been found, the earliest of which being the Phoenician. [3]
Egyptian Proto-Semitic
ox's head Phoenician
aleph Greek
Alpha Etruscan
A Roman/Cyrillic
A

In 1600 B.C., the Phoenician alphabet's letter had a linear form that served as the base for some later forms. Its name must have corresponded closely to the Hebrew or Arabic aleph.

Blackletter A
Uncial A
Another Blackletter A

Modern Roman A
Modern Italic A
Modern Script A
When the Ancient Greeks adopted the alphabet, they had no use for the glottal stop that the letter had denoted in Phoenician and other Semitic languages, so they used the sign to represent the vowel /a/, and kept its name with a minor change (alpha). In the earliest Greek inscriptions after the Greek Dark Ages, dating to the 8th century BC, the letter rests upon its side, but in the Greek alphabet of later times it generally resembles the modern capital letter, although many local varieties can be distinguished by the shortening of one leg, or by the angle at which the cross line is set.
The Etruscans brought the Greek alphabet to their civilization in the Italian Peninsula and left the letter unchanged. The Romans later adopted the Etruscan alphabet to write the Latin language, and the resulting letter was preserved in the modern Latin alphabet used to write many languages, including English.


Typographic variants include a double-story a and single-story ɑ.
The letter has two minuscule (lower-case) forms. The form used in most current handwriting consists of a circle and vertical stoke ("ɑ"), called Latin alpha or "script a". This slowly developed from the fifth-century form resembling the Greek letter tau in the hands of dark-age Irish and English writers.[3] Most printed material uses a form consisting of a small loop with an arc over it ("a"). Both derive from the majuscule (capital) form. In Greek handwriting, it was common to join the left leg and horizontal stroke into a single loop, as demonstrated by the Uncial version shown. Many fonts then made the right leg vertical. In some of these, the serif that began the right leg stroke developed into an arc, resulting in the printed form, while in others it was dropped, resulting in the modern handwritten form.
Usage

Main article: a
The letter A currently represents six different vowel sounds. In English, "a" by itself frequently denotes the near-open front unrounded vowel (/æ/) as in pad; the open back unrounded vowel (/ɑː/) as in father, its original, Latin and Greek, sound; a closer, further fronted sound as in "hare", which developped as the sound progressed from "father" to "ace"[3]; in concert with a later orthographic vowel, the diphthong /eɪ/ as in ace and major, due to effects of the great vowel shift; the more rounded form in "water" or its closely-related cousin, found in "was".[3]
In most other languages that use the Latin alphabet, "a" denotes an open front unrounded vowel (/a/). In the International Phonetic Alphabet, variants of "a" denote various vowels. In X-SAMPA, capital "A" denotes the open back unrounded vowel and lowercase "a" denotes the open front unrounded vowel.
"A" is the third common used letter in English, and the second most common in Spanish and French. In one study, on average, about 3.68% of letters used in English tend to be ‹a›s, while the number is 6.22% in Spanish and 3.95% in French.[4]
"A" is often used to denote something or someone of a better or more prestigious quality or status: A-, A or A+, the best grade that can be assigned by teachers for students' schoolwork; A grade for clean restaurants; A-List celebrities, etc. Such associations can have a motivating effect as exposure to the letter A has been found to improve performance, when compared with other letters.[5]
A turned "a", ‹ɐ› is used by the International Phonetic Alphabet for the near-open central vowel, while a turned capital "A" ("∀") is used in predicate logic to specify universal quantification.
[eComputing codes



Different glyphs of Unicode U+0061.
In Unicode, the capital "A" is codepoint U+0041 and the lower case "a" is U+0061.[6]
The closed form ("ɑ"), which is related with the lowercase alpha, has codepoint U+0251 (from the Code Chart "IPA Extensions".
The ASCII code for capital "A" is 65 and for lower case "a" is 97; or in binary 01000001 and 01100001, respectively.
The EBCDIC code for capital "A" is 193 and for lowercase "a" is 129; or in binary 11000001 and 10000001, respectively.
The numeric character references in HTML and XML are "A" and "a" for upper and lower case, respectively.
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Re: A's

Post by Peregrine on Thu Jun 09, 2011 4:40 pm

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Re: A's

Post by V on Thu Jun 09, 2011 9:33 pm

I like this guy.

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Re: A's

Post by Hunter Reckoning on Fri Jun 10, 2011 12:41 am

A's are something I dont get in school :P
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Re: A's

Post by Chamberino on Fri Jun 10, 2011 1:04 am


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Re: A's

Post by Tim Hortans on Fri Jun 10, 2011 1:49 am

i lold
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Re: A's

Post by Snukems on Sun Jun 12, 2011 9:37 am

Peregrine wrote:
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Re: A's

Post by AQWisgood on Sun Jun 12, 2011 2:44 pm

A's are something I probably[u] would get if i was in usa but sadly...no
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Re: A's

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